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The revised draft of Minneapolis 2040 was released in Fall 2018 for consideration by the Planning Commission and City Council.  Read more about how to comment on the revised draft plan.

NOTE CONTENT CHANGES: In response to public input, the proposed content of this topic has changed since its original draft publication on March 22, 2018. To hide or view the mark-ups click the link below.

Land Use & Built Form

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Photo: Photo by Dan Anderson, Courtesy of Meet Minneapolis

The Minneapolis 2040 goals describe a future for Minneapolis that is equitable, healthy, and sustainable. The policies of this plan are intended to provide an overarching structure for achieving those goals as they relate to the built, natural, and economic environment of our city.

Among the goals of this plan is to ensure that all Minneapolis residents will be able to afford and access quality housing throughout the city, that all Minneapolis residents will have access to a living wage job, and that all Minneapolis residents will have access to daily needs via walking, biking, and public transit. Policies associated with the topics of Housing, Economic Competitiveness, and Transportation describe proactive steps the City will take to achieve these goals.

This section, Land Use and Built Form, describes where new housing, workplaces, and retail establishments may locate in the city in order to achieve the plan goals. This guidance is communicated through a combination of policies and maps. The first four policies that appear below – Access to Housing, Access to Employment, Production and Processing, and Access to Commercial Goods and Services – form the basis for the Future Land Use Map and the Built Form Map that guide the location and characteristics of new buildings.

The Access to Housing policy outlines the role of the Future Land Use and Built Form maps in increasing housing choice throughout the city, acknowledging the contribution of zoning to racially-restrictive housing policiespractices of the first half of the 20th century, and the lasting effect those policiesactions had on people of color and indigenous people. The policy also reinforces the practice of developing multifamily housing on transit routes, providing people the opportunity to live without a car, or with fewer cars in each household, helping to work toward the City's greenhouse gas reduction goal. This policy, and the resultant housing guidance on the future land use and built form maps, ensures that we have places throughout the city to increase housing supply and choice. The remaining Housing policies of the plan communicate a commitment to proactively meeting the housing needs of Minneapolis residents, including through the production and preservation of affordable housing and expanding expansion of the City’s inclusionary housing policies and tools.

Together, the Access to Employment and Production and Processing policies outline the role of the Future Land Use and Built Form maps in supporting employment growth and ensuring that land is available for living-wage jobs in areas close to where people live. These policies work in conjunction with the Economic Competitiveness policies of this plan, which communicate a commitment to ensuring that Minneapolis residents have job training and skills necessary to participate in the economy, and will have access to living-wage jobs.

The Access to Commercial Goods and Services policy outlines the role of the Future Land Use and Built Form maps in providing the opportunity for Minneapolis residents to access daily needs without using a car. This is especially important because achieving the City’s goals of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions requires reducing the number of car trips in Minneapolis by 37%. People take more trips running errands than going to work, so it is critical to give people the opportunity to meet their daily needs closer to home.

The remaining policies inform the design of buildings and the spaces in between, and support the goals of a high-quality and distinctive environment, a clean environment, and a city that is resilient to climate change.

 Policies

17 Policies relate to this topic. Click on a policy below to learn more about it.

Maps: Future Land Use and Built Form

The draft Future Land Use and Built Form Maps are the primary tools for implementing the draft Land Use and Built Form policies of the Comprehensive Plan. They also embody and implement policies found throughout this plan, as well as the fourteen Comprehensive Plan Goals. The draft Future Land Use Map guides land use for every parcel in the city. Any changes to the use of land must be consistent with the guidance of the Future Land Use Map. The draft Built Form Map guides the scale of development for every parcel in the city through Built Form Districts. The built form of all new and remodeled buildings must be consistent with the guidance of the Built Form Map.

The maps, along with other policies in the plan, will be used to make decisions on development proposals and to shape regulations over the life of the document. Height, bulk, and setback standards, among other regulations, will continue to work in concert with and be informed by these maps and policies to guide and govern development that occurs throughout the city.

It is important to note that not every property in the city will be redeveloped between now and 2040. Rather, these maps provide guidance in the event that a change is proposed by a property owner. Following adoption of Minneapolis 2040, the City of Minneapolis will update its Zoning Code and Zoning Map to reflect the guidance of the Future Land Use and Built Form Maps.

The draft Future Land Use and Built Form Maps are displayed below. Above each map is an interactive legend. Click on a legend category to learn more about it. Clicking on a property in the map will display information about how the map guides the future of that location. For more information on the conditions that informed the creation of these maps, refer to the following resources:

 Future Land use Map

The draft Future Land Use Map guides the types of uses allowed on a given parcel according to the categories described below. The map guides use only. The Future Land Use Map works in tandem with the Built Form Map to provide a complete set of guidance for each parcel.

 Click here to view where changes were made to the Future Land Use Map in response to public comments

Future Land Use Categories

There are 12 Future Land Use Categories. Click on a land use category in the carousel below to learn more about it.

 Built Form Map

The draft Built Form Map guides the scale of development for every parcel in the city, independent of the uses allowed on the site. The built form of all new and remodeled buildings must be consistent with the guidance of the Built Form Map.

Click here to view where changes were made to the Built Form Map in response to public comments

Built Form Districts

There are 13 Built Form districts. Click on a Built Form district in the carousel below to learn more about it.

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